Category Archives: Uncategorized

Goddard’s world

The blog Watts up with That is famous for its attempt to reinvent climate physics on Earth, and now they want to reinvent astrophysics as well. Steve Goddard, a frequent poster at WUWT, now has a couple of posts (here and here) as well as write ups by Lubos Motl, about how the extreme temperatures on Venus are not caused by the greenhouse effect, but rather the 90 bar atmospheric pressure on Venus. It essentially argues that the “extra warming” by that we see on Venus is mostly due to the adiabatic lapse rate. As with many posts at WUWT, this radical idea which contradicts any textbook on planetary climate has been accepted without question by most commenters. Unfortunately for the massive attempt at a paradigm shift that is underway, they are all wrong.

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COMMENT ON “FALSIFICATION OF THE ATMOSPHERIC CO2 GREENHOUSE EFFECTS WITHIN THE FRAME OF PHYSICS”

This is the first formal, peer-reviewed response paper to Gerhard Gerlich and Ralf Tscheuschner and their alleged greenhouse falsification. It is here toward the bottom. It does not appear too many people have easy access, so I can only suggesting contacting one of the authors (such as Prof. Halpern) for a PDF. If you leave your email address in a comment on this blog I can do it as well and it will not be published online. I also encourage discussion on this at this forum

Cheers

Stephen Colbert, the Dopplest 9000, and skeptic logic

Proof that the sun has been destroyed

Ian Plimer’s questions to George Monbiot

Hopefully people interested in the blog wars have been alerted to the ongoing climate change “debate” between George Monbiot and Ian Plimer. If not, the best place to start is probably Monbiot’s blog itself (with several posts on the topic already). Greenfrye and Tamino also have some ongoing commentary, so have fun catching up on what’s going on.

Unfortunately, round 1 consisted of Plimer dodging Monbiot’s questions which ask Plimer to defend certain indefensible statements in his book “Heaven and Earth.” Maybe Plimer just “wanted to go first” so I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt, but his own set of questions intended for Monbiot are quite revealing about his intentions.

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An evolutionary sidenote

This post has nothing particular to do with climate change, but I thought it might be worth pointing out a recent study analyzing the evolutionary history of Africans and African Americans.

Africa is the source of all modern humans, originating there a few hundred thousand years ago and spreading across the globe within the last 100,000 years. The authors analyze DNA from 113 populations of Africans from across the continent and find that they descend from 14 ancestral groups (with the highest within-population diversity worldwide) and find significant associations between genetic and geographic (as well as linguistic) distance in all regions of Africa. These groups later interact with each other to create the distinct populations that exist today. The study of African genetic diversity will be important for reconstructing African and African American population histories, as well as the genetic basis of diseases prevalent in Africa.

As another sidenote, there is a new blog called Darwinaia which will have focus on paleontology, history of science (particularly evolutionary related stuff), so if you’re into that, check it out.

What if relative humidity was not constant?

I don’t like to comment about the information stemming from “Watts up with That” because no one in their right mind gets information from such a source, and by doing so I’m only allowing nonsense to set the tone in the climate debate, but Anthony Watts has a recent post about the water vapor feedback which I felt compelled to elaborate on.

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Perspectives on the Water Vapor feedback

The increase (decrease) in specific humidity under a global warming (cooling) situation represents the most powerful climate feedback as a response to radiative perturbations, effectively doubling the sensitivity of Earth’s climate.

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